Best TV 2017 UK: The best 4K and HD TVs

  • 168 Views

If you’re after a new TV and you want the best there is, you’ve come to the right place. Below we list the very best TVs – including 4K and HDR models – available to buy in the UK right now. Also see: Best TV Deals

We’ve tested and rated specific models, but other sizes are available in all ranges, so if one is slightly out of your price range or you just don’t want such a large one, then our ratings also apply to those too.

Alll but one of the TVs tested here have 4K resolutions. These UHD (Ultra HD) sets are the ones to buy now. Only go for a so-called Full-HD (1920×1080 pixels) set if you really can’t afford a 4K model. 4K content is becoming more widely available with broadcasters gearing up to show a lot of sport and drama in 4K in 2017. 4K is also available over your internet connection (as long as it’s quick enough – around 15Mb/s or so) via Amazon Video, Netflix and Sky Q. Alternatively you can buy a 4K Blu-ray player and buy movie discs.

BT also offers pay TV subscribers UHD sport (football, rugby, Moto GP, squash, to name but four) via its Infinity broadband delivered Sports channel. Because this streams at 2160/50p a much faster broadband connection is required. BT will generally refuse to offer a 4K set-top box to those Infinity customers on less than a 45Mb/s connection.

You might be interested in our roundup of the cheapest 4K TVs available to buy right now

See also: 4K and UHD explained

The best Black Friday TV deals today

Before you scroll down to our best TV list, here are some top savings on other models this Black Friday week.

TV buying guide

The latest generation of 4K televisions combine 3840×2160-pixel resolution – that’s four times more than Full HD – with the latest HDMI inputs able to handle incoming 4K content sources, such as Ultra HD Blu-ray and media streamers like the Nvidia Shield and Amazon Fire 4K TV box.

The key specification to look out for when it comes connectivity is a HDMI version 2 input with HDCP 2.2 support. The latter is a new level of copy protection is being used by all external 4K sources, so the more inputs that support it the better. If you buy a budget 4K telly, it most likely will only have one HDCP 2.2 compliant input. This could prove to be a bit of an Albatross when the content floodgates finally begin to open (have faith!).

The prices of 4K UHD TVs has fallen dramatically. Most are typically priced where HD models where just a few years ago. Manufacturers are transitioning all their larger sets to 4K resolution – so you’ll probably end up with one even if it’s not that important to you.

While the extra resolution that 4K offers is best appreciated on a large screen (55in plus), that hasn’t stopped smaller panels appearing. While there’s no reason not to buy a 4K TV at 40-inches, and the performance can be excellent, don’t expect to see overt picture improvements from typical viewing distances.

The general rule when buying a 4K set is go larger than your HD screen and view at the same distance, or sit closer. Or do both. 4K scales really large without revealing the pixels themselves, so it’s comfortable to view up close.

It’s worth remembering though that the 4K UHD specification is an ever-evolving feast. Unlike previous leaps in TV quality (black and white to colour, SD to HD), it’s not intended to launch full formed. Hence a rolling calendar of phased updates which will continue past 2020, maxing out with 8K resolutions screens. A new generation of HDR (High Dynamic Range) UHD TVs arrived this year which offer higher peak whites and better colour depth than what we have now. However, to appreciate these capabilities you need to feed your HDR 4K TV with HDR content, and there isn’t much around.

See also: Best smart TV deals

How we test TVs

All TVs are put through their paces with a variety of Full-HD and native 4K content. To further help assess motion resolution, colour performance, black levels and greyscale, we employ a variety of industry-grade test patterns.

All TVs are viewed with real-world content, delivered via onboard tuners, and with a selection of favoured Blu-rays, including Kill Bill Vol 2 (Uma Thurman’s burial is a dastardly test of dynamic contrast) and Interstellar. All 4K TVs will ‘upscale’ HD content to a lesser or greater degree (it won’t simply appear as a small box in the middle – it is ‘stretched’ to cover all 8 million pixels). It’s a task some do better than others.

Where appropriate, we also don 3D glasses to see just how convincing a dimensional experience the TVs deliver, with a little help from Disney’s Tangled and Avengers: Age of Ultron.

Of course, to really gauge the value of these UHD screens, you’ll need a native 4K source, and the only real options currently available are Amazon and Netflix (and 4K Blu-ray discs). Some sets have 4K services integrated, for the rest we delivered them via the Amazon 4K Fire TV box, an £79 streamer.

Finally, file-playback tests comprised accessing a collection of audio and video clips, comprising various codecs and wrappers, from both USB and a DLNA-capable QNAP NAS running Plex and Twonky Media.

Best TVs 2017

Sony ZD9 Series


Hisense H50N6800


Hisense H50N6800

Cello 55 Platinum P55ANSMT-4K


Cello 55 Platinum P55ANSMT-4K

Toshiba 49U7763DB


Toshiba 49U7763DB

Philips 43PUS6262


Philips 43PUS6262

LG 55OLEDB7


LG 55OLEDB7

Panasonic TX-55EZ952


Panasonic TX-55EZ952

Sony KD-65A1


Sony KD-65A1

LG OLED65W7 ‘Wallpaper’ TV


LG OLED65W7 ‘Wallpaper’ TV

Philips 9000 series 55POS901F/12


Philips 9000 series 55POS901F/12

Source link
 

Previous «
Next »